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20131202
20131210
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with nelson mandela. mr. swatwali, thank you for joining us. give us some thoughts, what it was like during the apartheid regime. tell us what it was like, eye specially on robben island in prison. >> well, let me first say that our people in south africa and the world have lost . >>> that's what we learned from nelson mandela. during the dark days with him on robben island. today he is seen as an icon of the world, whose teachings, as well as principles need to be embraced by all. he was embraced even by his own jailers, because he demonstrated that through the power of dialogue through the elements and two of reconciliation, people on different sides, former enemies, can come together. that's how -- we solve our intractable problems. we concluded that in order for us to create a new democratic society for a united and nonviolent south africa was to embrace all people. that was seen through the -- >> i have a pictures, mr. sexwale, of the cell. it's robben island. i think we'll be able to show our viewers, a cell where mr. nelson mandela spent so many years. there it is right there. awful
morning, and how wonderful it is to speak with you. mr. mandela was an anc member, actually one of the founders of the african national union. african national congress i was married to a south african freedom fighter was a member of the pac, pan-african congress. they were archrivals. mr. mandela came to egypt where i was living and i had been so used to these rivals arguing and shouting in the living room and in the streets against each other. there was also southwest africa national organization. when mr. mandela came he never had a crossword to say to anyone. i was amazed. i had never seen south africans who were that kind. he had a consummate to give to everybody including my housekeeper and the doorman, it was amazing. a gentle giant he was. >> schieffer: you know, you have written a wonderful poem celebrating his life and his passing. the state department has put it out on a video, i want to ask you about it, how it came about. let me play just a short clip of the beginning of this poem. >> the news came on the wings of the wind reluctant carry its burden. nelson mandela
with the country's leaders. those words lead the new york sometimes article that came out moments ago. mr. mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason. by negotiating with captors after his release in 1990, mandela led the african national congress long a banned liberation movement to an lek to recall victory in 1994, first fully democratic election in that country's history. the new york times goes on, mandela served one term as the president and had not been seen in public since the year 2010 when the nation hosted the world cup soccer tournament. decades in prison and insist ens on forgiveness made him a potent symbol of the struggle to end the country's domination and power of peaceful resolution in even the conflicts. we are joined now on the live line, mrs. smith. a difficult day, one we had been informed would be coming. that doesn't make it easier. >> i think south africans are pleased. [ inaudible ] he was a healthy man the most of his life. the last year was painful for him. >> we've clearly lost the connection with mrs. smith her authorized biographer. she was spea
was interviewed by ted koppel on night line and ted koppel leaned in and said, mr. mandela, the communist. they were the only ones that helped us. next question. >> you're talking about the controversial part, that he aligned himself with revolution areas like fidel castro, gaddafi and was briefly a member of the communist party. as you write about that in the book, he transcended that when he became president. he certainly didn't seem to follow -- and such. how did he do that? how did he transcend that? >> he believed so deeply in his cause. keep in mind what apartheid was like. here he had a small white minority that controlled the fast population and assets. south africa is a beautiful country with many, many assets. it was terrible what was going on there. i visited south africa more than once. i was there, my bride and i, and a small delegation from our administration. we were there in '91 as a guest. >> you met them there. you talk about the bitterness and lack of anger. he didn't go after his opponents. he started truth and reconciliation. >> isn't that something? truth and reconci
main soccer stadium. mr. mandela's remains will be on view to the public in pretoria beginning wednesday before being moved to the village of kun, where he grew up, where next sunday nelson mandela will be laid to rest. as for this sunday, countless americans here at home are reflecting on nell san mandela's legacy. wand that in mind we turn to bob schieffer in washington for look what's ahead on "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning, charles. we're going to talk to the poet mya angelo about the epic poem she has written to mark the passing of nelson mandela. >> osgood: we'll be watching. next week, here on "sunday morning." >> never so alive -- thank you. >> osgood: the real tale of charles dickens. >> you get the sense of furious energy in a way. man who can't stop. >> osgood: with actor ray finnes. anything we purchase c we leave you this sunday back in south africa at cougar national park. i'm charles osgood. please join us again next "sunday morning" until then i'll see you on the radio. know the feeling? copd includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. spiriva is
to announce that mr. nelson mandela will be released on sunday the 11th of february at about 3:00 p.m. >> so it was. february 11th, 1990, nelson mandela walked free. his wife at his side. ♪ black south africa erupted in orgy of celebration. >> we begin in south africa where it is welcome home day for nelson mandela. >> good morning, charlie. nelson mandela has been in johannesburg for about 18 hours but his real homecoming when he arrived in soweta in a town he hasn't seen nor 27 years. >> looking back, amazing scenes. the astonishing pictures, four years later in 1994 when fights stood with blacks in line to vote in south africa's first nonracial election, to elect nelson mandela, president. >> he wins them over. he seduces them. >> the book "playing the enemy" was turned in to the movie. there is no better example of how he seduced all races than the day south africa beat new zealand in the 1995 rugby world cup final. >> goal. >> rugby had been the white man's sport. the green jersey a symbol of apartheid for blacks. but here was south africa's first black president being cheered as he w
, the very same day that o'reilly was calling mr. mandela a communist last night, another fox news personality said about president obama on the same network, now, just hours earlier, listen to this. >> more class warfare, more radical wealth redistribution because this is who he is. he is essentially a statist. he is essentially a socialist. >> socialist, communist. so, i mean, this is almost like talking to sound bites being thrown around purposefully. >> they said the same things about dr. martin luther king jr. we can't judge what the obama presidency will be perceived 20 years from now. my suspicion is that a man that tried to make sure people had access to health care, i don't think they're going to say you know that's a lot like slavery or apartheid. i don't think that's going to be the legend of barack obama that we remember. >> you know, i think that people don't have a sense of how controversial these struggles were and how to fight opposition. i mean, i've been in the civil rights fight for the last several decades. and i remember the beginnings of the fight against apar
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> mandela emerged from behind bars to resume his campaigns. but tribal animosity and political division erupted. the bloody birth pangs. and there were personal problems, but nothing could deter mandela in his quest for racial equality. >> for our personal freedom. >> his work was recognized with a nobel peace prize as south africa's first black president, mandela remained a humble man. taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade, dancing at a convert in his honor, meeting with world leaders and his hero. as promise, he stepped down from president of south africa after serving one term. >> south africa has been a state to almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against him. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> and he admired a young senator, barack obama, as he stood in his prison cell. years later, he met mrs. obama and her daughters. by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. he
. mr. obama said of mandela what was said of another great emancipator, abraham lincoln: "he belongs to the ages." mandela's legacy, the president said, is a free south africa at peace with itself, an example to the world. for cbs news, i'm scott pelley. good night. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, [ female announcer ] for those who love sweets your season is here. let's just call it the baking time of year. you need special ingredients. you need the staples for homemade. you need safeway sugar for just a buck eighty-eight. and that magic thing that makes everyone want another only two ninety-nine and when hands get messy, quite surely they'll say, yum! wow! yay! what a sweeter holiday. safeway. ingredients for life.
that is emanating from there. i have to say that i read with a chuckle about the first time that you met mr. mandela back in 1990. i want you to tell people because you were literally star struck. >> i absolutely was. i've been blessed to be around some phenomenal people, some great leaders, but there's no one like nelson mandela. so yes, the first time i was in his company was immediately after we had organized a glorious ticker tape for him parade down broadway in manhattan. we took him into city hall in new york, and had found myself alone with him in the mayor's office. and i didn't realize that i had been just staring at the man for probably ten minutes till i heard a voice say, excuse me, young man. can i trouble you for that glass of water. i realized that he had probably asked me several times for some water after being out in the heat and this long parade. i raced, got him the water and darn near spilled it all over him, i was so incredibly nervous and in awe of him. even though when you were around him, you were in awe, there was something about him that will created an accessibility, too.
. here in london, mr. cameron called him a hero of all time. pope francis praised nelson mandela. human dignity, nonviolence and truth and in a strange twist in london, news of the death of mandela broke during the u.k. premier last night of the biography film of nelson mand a mandela, a long walk to freedom. his passing was announced at the end of the film to gasps of surprise and shock of the audience. the news just sinking in right now. statesmen, rock stars, regular people and here's more to come. back to you. >> thanks. >> president jacob zuma announcing a week of funeral services for the anti apartheid icon, dealing with the opening and closing of the world cup. an inauguration and coronation all combined together. on sunday, south africa observes a national day of prayer and reflection. tens of thousands or mourners are expected to attend a public memorial service. on tuesday at the soccer stadium, the site of the 2010 world cup final where mandela made his last public appearance. the former president remains then lie in state at government buildings from wednesday until friday
stunning, saying thicks like go home, ted, you're drunk. he, mandela, was communist terrorist and targeted people for no other reason than being white. stunned to see you support this scumb scumbag, mr. cruz. he was a communist, a huge supporter of abortion. putting him in the same language of stalin, fdr, who are also dead and don't deserve a eulogy either. what does that tell us about the generations reflecting on this? >> shocking comments. these are ted cruz's ostensible supporters. how incredibly disturbing must it be for americans to read that, to say this is -- this vein of political thought, however large or small it is, exists in our country. >> i hope it's disturbing to us. >> i hope so. >> i'm mostly disturbed that maybe it isn't disturbing to us. >> obviously americans who agree with it, they're out there. i can't imagine it's a very large population, but it saez lot about people have asked for a long time what's the racial perspective of tea party members. unfortunately this is the perspective of some of them. >> remember, where you started the conversation about dr. king, i w
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